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Old 25-01-2011, 01:33 PM
izafireman izafireman is offline
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Default Clay and Forging

Have any of you ever forged knives and done the thing with clay which makes the bake of the blades softer as its coated in the clay on forging. Does it make a difference as such and can this method be used to make fancy patterns in the surface of the blade...like appear on Japanese blades or does it have to be other stell than 01 to do that?

Pete

Also if its possible what kind of clay do you use?
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Old 25-01-2011, 04:29 PM
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A clay is used give what is essentially a differential quench, it leaves a patina on the blade.
Very pretty it is too

Works with many steels to a greater or lesser degree, but it is only a surface pattern, does not take much to remove it (Polish will remove it)

Best way is to experiment on a piece of 01.
Secret is to get the steel to quenching temp then quench immediately......heating for too long brings the steel coated in clay up to quench temperature which defeats the object.

Once I've finished making the furnace I'll be having a play

Forced patina's
You can also cut a juicy steak or wipe lemon juice on the steel, that will leave some interesting marks.....
Soak in vinegar overnight.
Or ferric chloride....
Acid
Onion juice
Mustard paste
Apple
Potatoes
Pomegranite


Cheers
Tom
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Last edited by Tom; 25-01-2011 at 04:35 PM.
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Old 25-01-2011, 05:03 PM
izafireman izafireman is offline
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Thanks for that Tom ..so I guess you have to have the blade near enough to final grind except the edge and then heat teat it....Just hope it doesnt warp ...

Rgds

Pete

Oh and thanks for the free liners and super fast service..

Last edited by izafireman; 25-01-2011 at 05:07 PM.
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Old 25-01-2011, 05:18 PM
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I believe the pattern you see is due to the difference in steel hardness. It is effectively a temper line, and is something of an art form. The proper term is a hamon and the clay used prevents the steel underneath from heating to the correct temperature for hardening. The exposed steel is brought up to temperature and quenched, which creates a hard edge and the difference in temperature results in the blade curving upwards. This is what give Japanese swords that distinctive upswept look.

Or that is my understanding of it! Google hamon and you'll learn a lot more on the subject.
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Old 26-01-2011, 11:28 PM
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the steel and clay are all heated toteh same temperature

the clay when quenched slows the cooling of the spine so it dosnt fully harden and forms a differnt structure ( its what happens if you wait to long to quench after removing from the heat ) this gives a transition area between the 2 structures its this that is brought out by polishing its always there but can disappear over time as the surface finish is effected but can be brought back by re polishing

patinas are differnt they are a surface effect and can be removed permenanly


O1 is supposed to be more difficult to get a good Hamon probably because it is fairly forgiving and has a longer min time delay from out of heat to quench below the critical point basic carbon steels are better

you can also get a similer effect by edge quenching
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Old 27-01-2011, 07:43 AM
izafireman izafireman is offline
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Cheers for that guys and what other steels that can be HT at home give a better effect if O1 is more difficult to get the effect?

Ta

Pete
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